Treasures from Eva

Very soon, as in later today, I’m making a trip to a local jeweler. I have important research to do.

They will not be too suspicious. And I may or may not share the real reason for my visit. You see, I’ve been wanting to try my hand with some historical fiction writing, Francine Rivers‘ style. It’s one of my favorite genres to read. It requires just enough research to keep things interesting, but not so much that I will drown in it.

Come on already, what are we talking about?

I think it’s cut glass and brass maybe? I think it’s beautiful.

This. My mother gave me this choker on my recent trip to Iowa. It had belonged to my Great Grandmother, Eva. She died in 1910, when her daughter, my Grandma Hazel, was very young. Miraculously, it was saved and passed on to her, and then to my mom, then me.

Years earlier, my mom gave me this beautiful piece, also from GG Eva. It’s been safely tucked away in my jewelry box. I hadn’t realized it was also from her. It’s so elegant, but it seems too fragile to wear. I’m not risking that heartbreak.

Eva and I have the same taste.

I know, right? These pieces are so gorgeous, and I am delighted that they’ve found their way into my possession. Here’s the thing: we have so little zero information about either piece. We know GG Eva’s full name, where she lived and when, but other than that, it’s a giant mystery.

Oooo, I want to know, don’t you?

Not only are they gorgeous heirlooms, it sounds like a book I would like to write. The girl goes on a quest to discover more about the treasure and its owner, and through the process, eventually, she discovers herself. It’s a good plot line with plenty of room for twists and turns and interesting characters.

It’s all swirling around, along with other book ideas in the queue. I haven’t actually started writing any of them. But putting it out on this blog helps keep me accountable. Also it means I’m spending time here instead of on that.

Oh, the challenges of the writer’s life! One of the gillion phrases underlined in my beloved copy of Anne Lamott’s, Bird by Bird. “Do it every day for a while,” my father kept saying. “Do it as you would do scales on the piano. Do it as a debt of honor. And make a commitment to finishing things.”

Thanks Anne, these are good words for me. I’ll put my butt in the chair and commit to getting words in the page.

Thanks for reading, until next time,
Sherri

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